Posts Tagged ‘Google’

L’internet des objets: gadget, serpent de mer ou révolution ?

Internet of things graphic no text

 

7 Avril 2014 – Les mauvaises langues prétendront, non sans quelques arguments, que l’IoT n’est qu’un autre serpent de mer de l’industrie informatique, au même titre par exemple que les systèmes de traduction automatique dont on nous promet l’avènement imminent depuis des lustres. Les premières évocations de l’IoT remontent en effet au début du siècle alors que la prophétie tarde visiblement à se réaliser. Pourtant depuis quelques mois les signes avant-coureurs d’une concrétisation se font plus insistants. Qu’on en juge par exemple à l’acquisition récente par Google de Nest Labs, un spécialiste de la domotique, ceci pour la modique somme de trois milliards de dollars. Ou encore par son activité R&D consacrée aux lentilles intelligentes capables de mesurer le taux de glucose dans les larmes, une étape peut-être pour remporter la bataille du diabète. Non content d’avoir organisé l’information au niveau global, le géant de Moutain View ambitionne désormais d’assoir son hégémonie en concevant les technologies de capteurs qui, demain, récupèreront l’information directement dans le monde physique plutôt que de passer par les humains, peu fiables et … Read more

It’s Computer Science Week. Chill. Code. Program. Do some math. Watch our video.

Computer science jobs

 

10 December 2013 – Computer code is something most people enjoy the benefits of without ever laying their eyes on it. But this week, it will be hard for students to avoid calls for them to learn how to program. There has been a promotional blitz this week for an education event called “Hour of Code” which has featured video statements from President Obama calling on students to learn how to write code, plus the home pages for Apple, Disney, Google, Microsoft, and Yahoo promoting the event.

Then there is Apple.  Tomorrow every Apple store in the United States will host code education events. Microsoft will host similar events at 51 Microsoft retail stores all this week.

Hour of Code, which coincides with Computer Science Education Week, is organized by a nonprofit organization called Code.org which is seeking to get more students interested in programming. It has the support of nearly all the major technology companies which say they need a stronger pipeline of engineers to supply the industry with the talent it needs to thrive. And you … Read more

A fragile quantum memory state has been held stable, overcoming a key barrier to ultrafast computers – and encryption continues its death march

 

 

Quantum Computer systems encryption

 

 

15 November 2013 – For a few years now we have been promised quantum computers. The media has been full of reports. It makes use of all that “spooky” quantum stuff and vastly increases computing power, right? And they’ll be under every desk when scientists finally tame the spooky stuff, right? And computing will undergo a revolution no less profound than the one that brought us the microchip, right? Wow. Another “tectonic-major-disruptive-paradigm-shift-game-changing” thingie. Cool. Will it be on the App Store?

We’ve actually been following quantum computing for awhile, through Greg’s contacts at CERN and IBM Research and mine at the Institute for Theoretical Physics at the University of Ulm, Germany.

It is fascinating stuff … and yes, having degrees in physics and computer science helps … but of late it has been a hot topic made more prominent with the big news this past Spring of the quantum computer collaboration among Google, NASA and D-Wave not least of which is the fact that futurist and artificial intelligence expert Ray Kurzweil (now Director of Engineering at … Read more

The importance of making Big Data accessible to non-data scientists

Data science for dummies 1

 

4 May 2013 – Gartner analyst Doug Laney first coined the term ”big data” over over 12 years ago although one suspects — at least in its current form — people have been complaining about “information overload” since Roman times. But the term’s meaning is still far from clear and it wins continuous nominations in the “Tech Buzzword That Everyone Uses But Don’t Quite Understand” competitions, followed closely by “the cloud”.

When using the term, Gartner usually keeps the quote marks in place (i.e. it’s “big data”, not big data). And as we learned at the Gartner Business Intelligence and Analytics Summit in Barcelona two months ago, Gartner has spent a tremendous amount of time on it. As Gartner analyst Donald Feinberg warned people at the conference “talking only about big data can lead to self-delusion” and he urged people not to “surrender to the hype-ocracy.”

NOTE: next month we’ll have a chance to talk about “big data” more with Gartner analyst Debra Logan along with Jason R. Baron when our video crew travels to Rome to interview Read more

Facebook’s latest server architecture: a challenge to OEMs IBM, H-P,and Dell? And Amazon and Google?

18 January 2013 – Facebook has provided a big endorsement for ARM server CPUs: the company is showing off a next-gen server architecture for its Open Compute platform for building cheap/dense/power-efficient IT infrastructures that allows companies to switch between various x86 and ARM CPUs by swapping boards. Applied Micro and Calxeda are the first ARM vendors to support it. The architecture will also support Intel’s silicon photonics tech, using it to handle 100G Ethernet links.

Pundits in the industry are saying this latest server architecture could present a huge challenge to server OEMs such as IBM, H-P , and Dell. Not only does the open-source architecture enable cheap, energy-efficient servers, it offers a tremendous amount of flexibility to install and swap out parts as users see fit. It arrives at a time when many incumbents are already struggling to deal with the adoption of cheap commodity servers by Internet/cloud giants.

And Rackspace is throwing its weight behind Facebook’s platform.  Embracing Open Compute could help Rackspace’s OpenStack solutions become more cost-competitive relative to Amazon and Google’s cloud infrastructure offerings – both … Read more

Take a walk through a Google data center

18 October 2012 –  Google, notoriously tight-lipped about the secrets locked away in its data centers, yesterday offered a rare glimpse inside those warehouses where information is processed for the company’s vast network of web services.  A newly launched site, Google Data Centers, lets users learn about eight centers located around the world, even offering 360-degree Street View images of the company’s endless server racks and labyrinthian cooling systems in the Lenoir, NC, center.
The company constructs its own facilities, is careful to regulate temperatures through environmentally friendly means (such as recycled water), and even attempts to select sites based on their naturally occurring resources.
But the company hasn’t let its guard down completely. Users who take the virtual tour of Lenoir will get a delightful geeky treat: a life-sized “Star Wars” stormtrooper can be seen standing guard at the end of a row of computers, as if to warn visitors that there’s a powerful force (ha!) watching them while they explore.
From the networking room to the cooling towers outside of the facility, you can explore the different areas … Read more

For Apple, Facebook and Google: the era of the 100 MW data center

2 February 2012 –  The first phase of Facebook’s data center in Prineville, Ore. will have a capacity for 28 MW of power, points out Data Center Knowledge. That’s about the same amount of power used by all the homes and businesses in the rest of the Oregon county where the data center is located. And that’s just the first of three potential parts of Facebook’s data center in Oregon. When all three stages are built out, the entire facility could have a whopping power capacity of 78 MW.

Data centers are increasingly requiring energy capacity of close to 100 MW of power, which is the equivalent power for about 80,000 U.S. homes, says Greenpeace. While most Internet companies don’t disclose the details of their facilities’ energy consumption, Apple’s billion-dollar data center in North Carolina is estimated to require 100 MW, according to Greenpeace. Google’s data center in North Carolina is estimated to require between 60 MW to 100 MW when the second phase of it is fully built out, and Facebook has another data center in North Carolina, which … Read more

Cloud server market explodes, fueled by of cloud-based consumer services from Apple-Amazon-Google

 

23 January 2012 – Cloud server sales will double in 2012, compared to 2010, and will double again by 2015, as a result of the stellar success of cloud-based consumer services from Apple, Amazon, Google and other industry powerhouses.

Cloud servers, which supply services to smartphones, tablets, laptops and desktop computers, are on track to become the most important segment of the server market, according to IHS iSuppli, which predicts that cloud server shipments will reach 875,000 units in 2012, up 35 percent from 647,000 in 2011, and nearly double the 460,000 cloud servers sold in 2010.

Consumer services such as Apple iCloud and the exploding diversity of software-, platform- and infrastructure-as-a-service business models, are driving a skyrocketing demand for cloud servers. Over the next three years, growth rates will be between 23 percent and 30 percent, ultimately doubling the consumption of cloud servers over 2012 to more than 1,774,000 units by 2015, according to iSuppli. This will make cloud servers the fastest-growing segment of the server industry.Overall, the five-year compound annual growth rate for cloud servers is destined … Read more

France’s cloud computing market set to exceed EUR 2 billion in 2011

23 January 2012 – The recent boom in data transmission and storage capacity has given rise to an increase in cloud computing in France — a sector that has been given the backing of the government’s National Investment Program. This market is set to surpass the €2 billion mark for France in 2011, and may make up more than 6% of the French software and IT-services industry in 2012.

“France is a growth market for high-tech and innovative companies, particularly in the cloud-computing sector, where the leading players are already here [in France], doing business,” points out David Appia, Chairman & CEO of the Invest in France Agency (IFA). 

In 2012, revenue from the global market for cloud-computing services totalled US$68.3 billion while, in Europe, the cloud computing market surged 20% and is predicted to account for almost 15% of the European software and IT-services market by 2015. 

The French market, which continues to grow strongly, was worth €1.85 billion in 2010, €672 million of which was generated by SMEs. This market is set to exceed €2 billion in 2011 … Read more

The War of Email Cloud Computing: Google vs. Microsoft

6 October 2011 – For an analysis of email cloud computing offerings from Google and Microsoft, including some interesting thoughts and predictions from Gartner, click here.… Read more