Archive for January, 2016

This just keeps getting better: laid off Disney IT workers scream “RICO!!”

RICO

 

27 January 2016 – So the latest in the laid off Disney IT worker saga. According to ComputerWorld:

“Disney IT workers laid off a year ago this month are now accusing the company and the outsourcing firms it hired of engaging in a ‘conspiracy to displace U.S. workers.’ The allegations are part of two lawsuits filed in federal court in Florida on Monday. Between 200 and 300 Disney IT workers were laid off in January 2015. Some of the workers had to train their foreign replacements — workers on H-1B visas — as a condition of severance. The lawsuits represent what may be a new approach in the attack on the use of H-1B workers to replace U.S. workers.

They allege violations of the Federal Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO), claiming that the nature of the employment of the H-1B workers was misrepresented, and that Disney and the contractors knew the ultimate intent was to replace U.S. workers with lower paid H-1B workers.”Read more

At how much risk is the U.S.’s critical infrastructure, really?

infrastructure

 

23 January 2016 – There is growing evidence that intrusions into the power grid and other critical infrastructure by hostile foreign nation states are real and happening. But there’s “much less agreement over how much of a threat hackers are,” writes Taylor Armerding. “On one side are those – some of them top government officials – who have warned that a cyber attack on the nation’s critical infrastructure could be catastrophic,”writes Armerding.

Others are crying FUD, including C. Thomas, a strategist at Tenable Network Security, who got some attention when he argued in an op-ed that the biggest threat to the U.S. power grid not a skilled hacker, but squirrels, are crying FUD.

Who has it right? Agreement seems to coalesce around two points:

1) the cyber security of industrial control systems remains notoriously weak, and

2) hostile hackers will improve their skills over time.

So, while we haven’t reached “catastrophe” yet, a properly motivated terrorist group could become a cyber threat.

 Read more

Preparing countermeasures for terror attacks using drones

Terror drones

13 January 2016 – You can add terrorist-controlled drones to the list of dangers we need to be prepared for, says the Oxford Research Group.

Its new report contains information about over 200 current and upcoming unmanned aerial, ground and marine systems, and evaluates their capabilities for delivering payloads (e.g. explosive devices), imaging capabilities (e.g. for reconnaissance purposes), and their general capabilities. Even though the report notes that commercial drones have a limited flight time, range of movement, and payload capacity, and that their operators still have to be relatively close to a potential target, the researchers are particularly worried about the possibility of drones being used as remotely controlled explosive devices. They say, “The technology of remote-control warfare is impossible to control; the ultimate defense is to address the root drivers of the threat in the first place.”… Read more