Archive for the ‘Google and the cloud’ Category

Tech titans prepare for the “next wave” of technologies by poaching each other’s top talent

 Next wave

 

(composite of multiple sources)

16 July 2014 –  Babak Parviz, who led the development team on Google’s high-tech spectacles, announced his move in cryptic fashion, posting Amazon’s logo on his Google+ page, with the comment “status: super excited.” However, he has so far declined to reveal what projects he will work on at the Seattle-based online retailer.

The creator of Google’s Glass headset is moving to Amazon as the industry’s leading companies battle to secure the bright minds who will help them discover the next breakthrough technology.

Amazon’s coup in poaching one of Google’s leading lights underlines the efforts being made by the industry’s biggest companies to prepare for the “next wave” of technologies. All are heavily investing in futuristic concepts in an effort to predict what ideas may disrupt their core businesses. Parviz was also the brain behind the Google’s “smart contact lenses”, which will help diabetics track their blood sugar levels and communicate the information to mobile devices. Yesterday Google announced a deal with pharmaceutical company Novartis to help develop the lenses commercially.

It’s about these companies … Read more

According to 451 Research, the cloud computing market may become an oligopoly of high-volume vendors

Oligopoly

 

16 July 2013 – Oligopoly: A market in which there are a limited number of providers providing the same service. Its political counterpart, oligarchy, means rule by a few. 

So starts an article by Joe McKendrick which was published in Forbes magazine last week, leading off his review of a research note by Owen Rogers, senior analyst at 451 Research, who suggests the emergence of an IT oligopoly. It’s a brilliant research note and provides a great “cloudonomics” tutorial.

Is the cloud computing marketplace becoming the domain of a few big vendors? With large players including Amazon, Microsoft, Google and IBM coming online with similar types of services, we may be starting to see a consolidation of the primary cloud computing market into the hands of a few powerful vendors.

Actually, Owen’s report goes further to say what is emerging is both an oligopoly and monopoly at the same time. With identical services comes commoditization, and only big vendors that can deliver huge economies of scale with margins will survive in this space. He adds that perhaps the “oligopoly … Read more

The importance of making Big Data accessible to non-data scientists

Data science for dummies 1

 

4 May 2013 – Gartner analyst Doug Laney first coined the term ”big data” over over 12 years ago although one suspects — at least in its current form — people have been complaining about “information overload” since Roman times. But the term’s meaning is still far from clear and it wins continuous nominations in the “Tech Buzzword That Everyone Uses But Don’t Quite Understand” competitions, followed closely by “the cloud”.

When using the term, Gartner usually keeps the quote marks in place (i.e. it’s “big data”, not big data). And as we learned at the Gartner Business Intelligence and Analytics Summit in Barcelona two months ago, Gartner has spent a tremendous amount of time on it. As Gartner analyst Donald Feinberg warned people at the conference “talking only about big data can lead to self-delusion” and he urged people not to “surrender to the hype-ocracy.”

NOTE: next month we’ll have a chance to talk about “big data” more with Gartner analyst Debra Logan along with Jason R. Baron when our video crew travels to Rome to interview Read more

Get Your Head in the Cloud: your personal use of the cloud

It has been brought to my attention that there are still some hold?outs on the Cloud revolution. The Citrix Cloud Survey Guide found that 54% of respondents claimed to never have used Cloud computing (although the survey also found that 95% of them actually do use the Cloud but don’t know it). These individuals refuse to use the Cloud to back?up data, share photos or provide remote access to their data. Instead, they carry zip drives and email themselves documents. So, this one’s for you, lovers of technical nostalgia, join the Cloud, the view is great from up here!

How Does it Work?

First, decide which files you want to add. Music, photos, that half?finished novel, your resume…all make great additions to the Cloud. Not only will you be able to access the information remotely but it is also protected in case your device meets with an untimely end. Next, choose a provider. Apple users are generally partial to iCloud. Create an account, register all your devices and the iCloud application will walk you through the entire process of selecting … Read more

Take a walk through a Google data center

18 October 2012 –  Google, notoriously tight-lipped about the secrets locked away in its data centers, yesterday offered a rare glimpse inside those warehouses where information is processed for the company’s vast network of web services.  A newly launched site, Google Data Centers, lets users learn about eight centers located around the world, even offering 360-degree Street View images of the company’s endless server racks and labyrinthian cooling systems in the Lenoir, NC, center.
The company constructs its own facilities, is careful to regulate temperatures through environmentally friendly means (such as recycled water), and even attempts to select sites based on their naturally occurring resources.
But the company hasn’t let its guard down completely. Users who take the virtual tour of Lenoir will get a delightful geeky treat: a life-sized “Star Wars” stormtrooper can be seen standing guard at the end of a row of computers, as if to warn visitors that there’s a powerful force (ha!) watching them while they explore.
From the networking room to the cooling towers outside of the facility, you can explore the different areas … Read more

An Open-Source Food Fight in the Cloud

6 April 2012 –  To date, the four horsemen of the cloud appear to be Amazon.com, Microsoft, Google and VMware.  The first three companies have built their own cloud computing services that consumers and businesses can tap into. Instead of doing its own service, VMware, the maker of virtualization software, is selling a new suite of cloud software so that service providers and businesses can build their own new-age, cloud computing systems.

The collective muscle and proprietary leanings of those four companies has triggered something of a cloud panic. At its core, cloud computing promises lower costs and greater flexibility than traditional data centers. It’s a way to avoid lock-in, that mainframe-era problem where a company buys its own big, expensive systems—and is stuck with them. But those advantages could be undermined if, say, Amazon decides to play the heavy and makes it difficult for companies to move their software and data onto a competing cloud service. That would be lock-in, cloud edition.

To counter the big cloud players, the software maker Citrix has decided to open-source its CloudStack software. … Read more

For Apple, Facebook and Google: the era of the 100 MW data center

2 February 2012 –  The first phase of Facebook’s data center in Prineville, Ore. will have a capacity for 28 MW of power, points out Data Center Knowledge. That’s about the same amount of power used by all the homes and businesses in the rest of the Oregon county where the data center is located. And that’s just the first of three potential parts of Facebook’s data center in Oregon. When all three stages are built out, the entire facility could have a whopping power capacity of 78 MW.

Data centers are increasingly requiring energy capacity of close to 100 MW of power, which is the equivalent power for about 80,000 U.S. homes, says Greenpeace. While most Internet companies don’t disclose the details of their facilities’ energy consumption, Apple’s billion-dollar data center in North Carolina is estimated to require 100 MW, according to Greenpeace. Google’s data center in North Carolina is estimated to require between 60 MW to 100 MW when the second phase of it is fully built out, and Facebook has another data center in North Carolina, which … Read more

In the world of “Big Data”, the top 12 data analytics players

               Big Data Analytics Goes … well, Big Time

18 October 2011 —  Organizations around the globe and across industries have learned that the smartest business decisions are based on fact, not gut feel. That means they’re based on analysis of data, and it goes way beyond the historical information held in internal transaction systems. Internet clickstreams, sensor data, log files, mobile data rich with geospatial information, and social-network comments are among the many forms of information now pushing information stores into the big-data league above 10 terabytes.

Trouble is, conventional data warehousing deployments can’t scale to crunch terabytes of data or support advanced in-database analytics. Over the last decade, massively parallel processing (MPP) platforms and column-store databases have started a revolution in data analysis. But technology keeps moving, and we’re starting to see upgrades that are blurring the boundaries of known architectures. What’s more, a whole movement has emerged around NoSQL (not only SQL) platforms that take on semi-structured and unstructured information.

InformationWeek has created an image gallery that presents a 2011 update on what’s available, with options including EMC’s … Read more

Google Introduces Cloud Database

7 October 2011 – Google has launched a new service to make its cloud computing platform more appealing to businesses. The company on Thursday introduced a limited preview of Google Cloud SQL, a scalable, hosted MySQL database environment.

Navneet Joneja, product manager for Google Cloud SQL, says that one of the most frequent requests from Google App Engine users has been for an easy way to develop traditional database-driven applications. Using App Engine, Google’s platform-as-a-service offering, in conjunction with Cloud SQL allows developers to avoid the burden of database management, maintenance, and administration.

And at the moment, the price is hard to beat.  “Cloud SQL is available free of charge for now, and we will publish pricing at least 30 days before charging for it,” said Joneja in a blog post. Google says it will not charge for the service in 2011.

For more click here.… Read more

The War of Email Cloud Computing: Google vs. Microsoft

6 October 2011 – For an analysis of email cloud computing offerings from Google and Microsoft, including some interesting thoughts and predictions from Gartner, click here.… Read more