Archive for the ‘Artificial Intelligence’ Category

“Every breath you take” – record health data, keep tabs on your mood. Without you even noticing. Without being attached to a device.

Vital-Radio

Eric De Grasse, Chief Technology Officer

5 May 2015 – The past few weeks we have seen a tsunami of health-tracking developments, much of it discussed at the RSA Conference in San Francisco which we recently attended.  Coolest bit at RSA this year: it opened with everyone sitting in the dark. Literally. Amit Yoran, the new president of RSA Security, began his opening keynote while standing on a dark stage. “My stumbling around in the dark is a pretty good metaphor for anyone who’s trying to protect networks today,” Yoran said, describing how the industry has failed to deliver on its promises. “2014 was yet another reminder that we’re losing the contest. We can neither secure nor trust the pervasive complex, and worse, end-point participants in any large or distributed committing environment”.

The RSA conference emphasized the obvious: in the digital world in which we now live, information is the most highly valued commodity. Safeguarding that information, therefore, has become a top priority. And the “experts” are failing miserably.

The big event this month was the Apple Watch with its … Read more

That giant sucking sound …. is that AI technology destroying more jobs than it creates?

AI and jobs

 

 

Gregory P. Bufithis, Esq.

 

 

18 December 2014 – Claire Cain Miller notes in the New York Times that economists long argued that, just as buggy-makers gave way to car factories, technology used to create as many jobs as it destroyed.

But now there is deep uncertainty about whether the pattern will continue, as two trends are interacting:

First, artificial intelligence has become vastly more sophisticated in a short time, with machines now able to learn, not just follow programmed instructions, and to respond to human language and movement.

Second, at the same time, the American work force has gained skills at a slower rate than in the past — and at a slower rate than in many other countries.

When the University of Chicago asked a panel of leading economists about automation, 76 percent agreed that it had not historically decreased employment. But when asked about the more recent past, they were less sanguine. About 33 percent said technology was a central reason that median wages had been stagnant over the past decadeRead more

Artificial Intelligence: will it exterminate us, or empower us?

artificial intelligence robot human hand
 

Gregory P. Bufithis, Esq.

16 December 2014 – Oren Etzioni has been an artificial intelligence researcher for over 20 years, and he’s currently CEO of the Allen Institute for AI. When he heard the dire warnings recently from both Elon Musk and Stephen Hawking, he decided it’s time to have an intelligent discussion about AI.

He says the popular dystopian vision of AI is wrong for one simple reason: it equates intelligence with autonomy. That is, it assumes a smart computer will create its own goals, and have its own will, and will use its faster processing abilities and deep databases to beat humans at their own game. To say that AI will start doing what it wants for its own purposes is like saying a calculator will start making its own calculations.

Etzioni adds, “If unjustified fears lead us to constrain AI, we could lose out on advances that could greatly benefit humanity — and even save lives. Allowing fear to guide us is not intelligent.”… Read more

If the U.S. Navy was involved in finding the missing Malaysian plane they’d be using Bayesian search techniques

Search Efforts + MapBox Reference Layer + Watermask + Satellite

 Map of the search area from Mapbox, as of yesterday, with the footprints of the available data from major satellite providers

 

17 March 2014 – Benedict Carey reports in the New York Times that the uncertainties surrounding Malaysia Airlines Flight 370’s disappearance are enormous, but naval strategists have been unraveling lost-at-sea mysteries as far back as the U-boat battles of World War II, and perhaps most dramatically in 1968, when an intelligence team found the submarine Scorpion, which sank in the North Atlantic after losing contact under equally baffling circumstances. “The same approach we used with Scorpion could be applied in this case and should be,” says John P. Craven who helped pioneer the use of Bayesian search techniques to locate objects lost at sea. “But you need to begin with the right people.” The approach is a kind of crowdsourcing, but not one in which volunteers pored over satellite images, like they have in search of Flight 370. “That effort is akin to good Samaritans combing a forest for a lost child without knowing for … Read more

Ok. We are all talking about it, but just how BIG is the field of artificial intelligence?

 

artificial intelligence

 

 

MIRI

 

 

18 February 2014 – As Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee detail in their latest book The Second Machine Age, the exponential, digital, and recombinant powers of the second machine age have made it possible for humanity to create two of the most important one-time events in our history: the emergence of real, useful artificial intelligence (AI) and the connection of most of the people on the planet via a common digital network. Either of these advances alone would fundamentally change our growth prospects. When combined, they’re more important than anything since the Industrial Revolution, which forever transformed how physical work was done.

Digital machines have escaped their narrow confines and started to demonstrate broad abilities in pattern recognition, complex communication, and other domains that used to be exclusively human. We’ve recently seen great progress in natural language processing, machine learning (the ability of a computer to automatically refine its methods and improve its results as it gets more data), computer vision, simultaneous localization and mapping, and many other areas.

But just how big is … Read more

It’s Computer Science Week. Chill. Code. Program. Do some math. Watch our video.

Computer science jobs

 

10 December 2013 – Computer code is something most people enjoy the benefits of without ever laying their eyes on it. But this week, it will be hard for students to avoid calls for them to learn how to program. There has been a promotional blitz this week for an education event called “Hour of Code” which has featured video statements from President Obama calling on students to learn how to write code, plus the home pages for Apple, Disney, Google, Microsoft, and Yahoo promoting the event.

Then there is Apple.  Tomorrow every Apple store in the United States will host code education events. Microsoft will host similar events at 51 Microsoft retail stores all this week.

Hour of Code, which coincides with Computer Science Education Week, is organized by a nonprofit organization called Code.org which is seeking to get more students interested in programming. It has the support of nearly all the major technology companies which say they need a stronger pipeline of engineers to supply the industry with the talent it needs to thrive. And you … Read more

A fragile quantum memory state has been held stable, overcoming a key barrier to ultrafast computers – and encryption continues its death march

 

 

Quantum Computer systems encryption

 

 

15 November 2013 – For a few years now we have been promised quantum computers. The media has been full of reports. It makes use of all that “spooky” quantum stuff and vastly increases computing power, right? And they’ll be under every desk when scientists finally tame the spooky stuff, right? And computing will undergo a revolution no less profound than the one that brought us the microchip, right? Wow. Another “tectonic-major-disruptive-paradigm-shift-game-changing” thingie. Cool. Will it be on the App Store?

We’ve actually been following quantum computing for awhile, through Greg’s contacts at CERN and IBM Research and mine at the Institute for Theoretical Physics at the University of Ulm, Germany.

It is fascinating stuff … and yes, having degrees in physics and computer science helps … but of late it has been a hot topic made more prominent with the big news this past Spring of the quantum computer collaboration among Google, NASA and D-Wave not least of which is the fact that futurist and artificial intelligence expert Ray Kurzweil (now Director of Engineering at … Read more

Now THIS is artificial intelligence at work! The EU is to develop smart clothing in a cloud computing structure

 AI in smart clothing

 

14 October 2013 – The European Union (EU) has launched a project for the development of smart clothing with wearable technology in cloud computing at the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI-Rhineland-Palatinate) in Kaeserslautern, in southwest Germany.

The project is titled “Easy-IMP” — Collaborative Development of Intelligent Wearable Meta Products in the cloud — and was launched in September 2013 with an investment of € 4.4 million for over three years.  The EU has developed an interdisciplinary team of experts in sensor technology, computer science, web programming, biomechanics, rehabilitation and sports, to find new methods and tools for creating the smart clothes.
According to a statement issued by DFKI, a typical example of such type of clothing is to provide a common platform that can be used and customized by downloading apps for a variety of applications. A part of this concept has been utilized in Easy-IMP smart clothing, where the garment can be configured via a smart phone to detect motion or vital data of the user and to use in conjunction with an app for … Read more

Quantum computers of the future will have the potential to give artificial intelligence a major boost

Quantum computers

 

30 July 2013 – Algorithms developed so far for quantum computers have typically focused on problems such as breaking encryption keys or searching a list — tasks that normally require speed but not a lot of intelligence. But in a series of papers posted online this month on Arxiv (which is an open e-print archive with over 100,000 articles in physics, 10000 in mathematics, and 1000 in computer science) Seth Lloyd of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge and his collaborators have put a quantum twist on AI.

The team developed a quantum version of “machine learning”, a type of AI in which programs can learn from previous experience to become progressively better at finding patterns in data. Machine learning is popular in applications ranging from e-mail spam filters to online-shopping suggestions. The team’s invention would take advantage of quantum computations to speed up machine-learning tasks exponentially.

You can read more in an article that posted in Nature magazine by clicking here.

 

 

 … Read more

Sophisticated AI program helps reassemble more than 100,000 document fragments collected across 1,000 years

AI document fragments

 

28 May 2013 – One scholar likened it to finding the orphaned socks for generations of a family. Another compared it to law-enforcement’s use of DNA databases and face-recognition software. The idea is to harness technology to help reassemble more than 100,000 document fragments collected across 1,000 years that reveal details of Jewish life along the Mediterranean, including marriage, medicine and mysticism. For decades, scholars relied mainly on memory to match up pieces of the Cairo genizah, a treasure trove of papers that include works by the rabbinical scholar Maimonides, parts of Torah scrolls and prayer books, reams of poetry and personal letters, contracts, and court documents, even recipes (there is a particularly vile one for honey-wine).

Now, for the first time, a sophisticated artificial intelligence program running on a powerful computer network is conducting 4.5 trillion calculations per second to vastly narrow down the possibilities.

“In one hour, the computer can compare 10 million pairs — 10 million pairs is something a human being cannot do in a lifetime,” said Roni Shweka, who has advanced degrees in both … Read more