Archive for the ‘Facebook and the cloud’ Category

Facebook’s latest server architecture: a challenge to OEMs IBM, H-P,and Dell? And Amazon and Google?

18 January 2013 – Facebook has provided a big endorsement for ARM server CPUs: the company is showing off a next-gen server architecture for its Open Compute platform for building cheap/dense/power-efficient IT infrastructures that allows companies to switch between various x86 and ARM CPUs by swapping boards. Applied Micro and Calxeda are the first ARM vendors to support it. The architecture will also support Intel’s silicon photonics tech, using it to handle 100G Ethernet links.

Pundits in the industry are saying this latest server architecture could present a huge challenge to server OEMs such as IBM, H-P , and Dell. Not only does the open-source architecture enable cheap, energy-efficient servers, it offers a tremendous amount of flexibility to install and swap out parts as users see fit. It arrives at a time when many incumbents are already struggling to deal with the adoption of cheap commodity servers by Internet/cloud giants.

And Rackspace is throwing its weight behind Facebook’s platform.  Embracing Open Compute could help Rackspace’s OpenStack solutions become more cost-competitive relative to Amazon and Google’s cloud infrastructure offerings – both … Read more

Investors and users beware: Facebook is all about IT (and that 30 petabytes Hadoop cluster)

By:  Gregory P Bufithis, Esq.  

2 February 2012 –  The nerve of Facebook.   Filing its S-1 during LegalTech when many of us were deeply ensconced in the issues surrounding the cloud and ediscovery.

As Gigaom points out, by now every statement in Facebook’s S-1 filing has already been pored over to death (I downloaded the S-1 to my iPad and enjoyed it over dinner last night) … published, blogged  and analyzed. Karsten Weide, a technology analyst with IDC, posted an analysis last night and reflected what many of the number crunchers have been saying:

“This filing implies Facebook is valued at $100 billion, which I think is too high. That’s about 27 times more than their 2011 revenue. But even assuming they can double revenue this year, I think it’s too high. It’s reminiscent of the valuations for stocks in the Internet 1.0 days.  Even if it were valued at just at $80 billion, I think it would be too high. There are a number of challenges and risks Facebook faces, and one is the growth of Google Plus … Read more

For Apple, Facebook and Google: the era of the 100 MW data center

2 February 2012 –  The first phase of Facebook’s data center in Prineville, Ore. will have a capacity for 28 MW of power, points out Data Center Knowledge. That’s about the same amount of power used by all the homes and businesses in the rest of the Oregon county where the data center is located. And that’s just the first of three potential parts of Facebook’s data center in Oregon. When all three stages are built out, the entire facility could have a whopping power capacity of 78 MW.

Data centers are increasingly requiring energy capacity of close to 100 MW of power, which is the equivalent power for about 80,000 U.S. homes, says Greenpeace. While most Internet companies don’t disclose the details of their facilities’ energy consumption, Apple’s billion-dollar data center in North Carolina is estimated to require 100 MW, according to Greenpeace. Google’s data center in North Carolina is estimated to require between 60 MW to 100 MW when the second phase of it is fully built out, and Facebook has another data center in North Carolina, which … Read more

Swedish town set to become “Node pole” as Facebook builds massive data centre

27 November 2011 — Perched near the Arctic Circle, the Swedish town of Luleaa hopes that a massive data centre for US social networking giant Facebook will launch the vibrant industrial region into the digital age as a European data traffic hub.  In October, Facebook announced it had chosen the Swedish town for its first European data centre, and third globally, in large part because of its “suitable climate for environmental cooling (and) clean power resources.”  The icy region, located on the same latitude as Fairbanks, Alaska, was especially attractive due to its climate, “since cooling (computer) servers is a major issue for data centres,” Facebook said.

For more click here.… Read more

Facebook to build server farm on edge of Arctic Circle

26 October 2011 – Facebook is to build a multi-million ‘mini town’ on the edge of the Arctic circle to house all its computer servers, which would us as much electricity as a town of 50,000 people.  The enormous server farm facility in Luleå, northern Sweden, to be announced officially on Thursday morning, is the first time that the social networking giant has chosen to locate a server farm outside the US.   “The climate will allow them to just use only air for cooling the servers,” said Mats Engman, chief executive of the Aurorum Science Park, which is leading the push to turn the city into a ‘Node Pole’, luring in other international computing giants.  “If you take the statistics, the temperature has not been above 30C [86F] for more than 24 hours since 1961. If you take the average temperature, it’s around 2C [35.6F].”   Luleå is situated at the northern tip of the Baltic Sea, just over 62 miles South of the Arctic Circle.  Taking advantage of the rock bottom temperatures, Facebook plans to build three giant server halls … Read more