Archive for the ‘Apple and the cloud’ Category

According to 451 Research, the cloud computing market may become an oligopoly of high-volume vendors

Oligopoly

 

16 July 2013 – Oligopoly: A market in which there are a limited number of providers providing the same service. Its political counterpart, oligarchy, means rule by a few. 

So starts an article by Joe McKendrick which was published in Forbes magazine last week, leading off his review of a research note by Owen Rogers, senior analyst at 451 Research, who suggests the emergence of an IT oligopoly. It’s a brilliant research note and provides a great “cloudonomics” tutorial.

Is the cloud computing marketplace becoming the domain of a few big vendors? With large players including Amazon, Microsoft, Google and IBM coming online with similar types of services, we may be starting to see a consolidation of the primary cloud computing market into the hands of a few powerful vendors.

Actually, Owen’s report goes further to say what is emerging is both an oligopoly and monopoly at the same time. With identical services comes commoditization, and only big vendors that can deliver huge economies of scale with margins will survive in this space. He adds that perhaps the “oligopoly … Read more

In the wake of the Boston Marathon bombings a new hero emerges: technology

Got him

By:  Gregory P. Bufithis, Founder & CEO

22 April 2013 – In the wake of the Boston Marathon bombings we saw a new hero emerge: technology. The fast responses of medical professionals already onsite likely saved numerous lives. Furthermore, those runners that finished the race and then continued on to donate blood at the local hospital should be praised as well. The human element, no doubt, played a vital role in minimizing casualties and helping people get medical attention quickly.

But as we read and analyzed the situation, saw what law enforcement and public officials were doing, we saw the new tools at their disposal, all from technology.

According to numerous media sources reporting on the Boston Marathon bomb attack, the FBI collected more than 10 terabytes of video and mobile phone data.  Within hours of obtaining identifications of the Boston marathon bombing suspects, police obtained search warrants and extensive digital records from mobile phone networks and social media and e-mail providers.  The data included call logs collected by cellphone towers along the marathon route and surveillance footage collected by … Read more

Get Your Head in the Cloud: your personal use of the cloud

It has been brought to my attention that there are still some hold?outs on the Cloud revolution. The Citrix Cloud Survey Guide found that 54% of respondents claimed to never have used Cloud computing (although the survey also found that 95% of them actually do use the Cloud but don’t know it). These individuals refuse to use the Cloud to back?up data, share photos or provide remote access to their data. Instead, they carry zip drives and email themselves documents. So, this one’s for you, lovers of technical nostalgia, join the Cloud, the view is great from up here!

How Does it Work?

First, decide which files you want to add. Music, photos, that half?finished novel, your resume…all make great additions to the Cloud. Not only will you be able to access the information remotely but it is also protected in case your device meets with an untimely end. Next, choose a provider. Apple users are generally partial to iCloud. Create an account, register all your devices and the iCloud application will walk you through the entire process of selecting … Read more

For Apple, Facebook and Google: the era of the 100 MW data center

2 February 2012 –  The first phase of Facebook’s data center in Prineville, Ore. will have a capacity for 28 MW of power, points out Data Center Knowledge. That’s about the same amount of power used by all the homes and businesses in the rest of the Oregon county where the data center is located. And that’s just the first of three potential parts of Facebook’s data center in Oregon. When all three stages are built out, the entire facility could have a whopping power capacity of 78 MW.

Data centers are increasingly requiring energy capacity of close to 100 MW of power, which is the equivalent power for about 80,000 U.S. homes, says Greenpeace. While most Internet companies don’t disclose the details of their facilities’ energy consumption, Apple’s billion-dollar data center in North Carolina is estimated to require 100 MW, according to Greenpeace. Google’s data center in North Carolina is estimated to require between 60 MW to 100 MW when the second phase of it is fully built out, and Facebook has another data center in North Carolina, which … Read more

Apple Pumps Sunlight Into iCloud Data Center

26 October 2011 – Behind Apple’s new cloud, there’s sunlight.   Apple’s massive new data center in Maiden, North Carolina drives the company’s sparkling new iCloud service, and according to a report from the Charlotte Observer, sunlight will provide some of the considerable power needed to run the facility.  The company is building a solar power plant across the street from the data center, the newspaper said, citing county permits that allow the company to regrade 171 acres in preparation for building a solar farm.  Apple didn’t respond to a request for comment. But the investment in renewable energy clearly marks a shift for the company, which has taken heat from environmental groups for its energy practices. The company has lagged behind other cloud players, most notably Google, in going green.

For more click here.… Read more

In the world of “Big Data”, the top 12 data analytics players

               Big Data Analytics Goes … well, Big Time

18 October 2011 —  Organizations around the globe and across industries have learned that the smartest business decisions are based on fact, not gut feel. That means they’re based on analysis of data, and it goes way beyond the historical information held in internal transaction systems. Internet clickstreams, sensor data, log files, mobile data rich with geospatial information, and social-network comments are among the many forms of information now pushing information stores into the big-data league above 10 terabytes.

Trouble is, conventional data warehousing deployments can’t scale to crunch terabytes of data or support advanced in-database analytics. Over the last decade, massively parallel processing (MPP) platforms and column-store databases have started a revolution in data analysis. But technology keeps moving, and we’re starting to see upgrades that are blurring the boundaries of known architectures. What’s more, a whole movement has emerged around NoSQL (not only SQL) platforms that take on semi-structured and unstructured information.

InformationWeek has created an image gallery that presents a 2011 update on what’s available, with options including EMC’s … Read more

Cloud May Put Operating Systems Out of Their Misery

14 October 2011 —  Think back to 1995, to one of the biggest events of that year — Microsoft’s launch of Windows 95. Lines formed at computer stores. Mick Jagger performed the OS’s adopted theme song “Start Me Up.” Jay Leno emceed the launch event. Graphics! Icons! Toolbars! Everyone was excited.

Nowadays, outside of developers, does anybody really get excited about new OS launches anymore? Now the excitement is on the services that reside out on the Web — be it social networks or cloud-based services. Often anymore, the OS just seems like something that gets in the way.

That’s why Mat Honan’s latest post on Gizmodo was so intriguing — suggesting that Apple’s now-available iCloud represents the beginning of an era of computing without computers.

For more click here.… Read more

Cloud comparison: Apple iCloud vs. Google vs. Windows Live

3 October 2011 – “The cloud” has long been a buzzword in the tech scene but it has become an ever-important part of our daily computing lives and Apple’s iOS, Google’s Android and Microsoft’s Windows Phone Mango all have deep integration with the cloud, but use it in slightly different ways.

Click here to take a look at how each of the major operating systems bring the cloud into your lives.… Read more